Home network expansion issues

by user1938027   Last Updated January 13, 2018 01:01 AM

I have a simple home network: ISP cable goes into router (netgear wndr3700 running ddwrt) which provides connection to all devices, static wired clients and dhcp wireless, (see scheme below, left side). Router-ISP connection authentication is based on MAC-ip pair - no passwords or whatever. I need to add another pc to my network; there are some limitations though - it is not physically possible to connect that pc to the router, but possible in front of router. There is a rule: all pcs must be able to reach each other (not required to be in the same subnet, ie pc1 is 192.168.1.2 and pc3 is 192.100.200.300). Since that would be a pc not suited to pass all traffic from and to the router, I decided to split my network by putting a device between the ISP and router (see middle part of the scheme).

Here is the question - what kind of device do I need, another router or just a switch, such as D-link DGS-1100-05 (http://www.dlink.com/uk/en/products/dgs-1100-pd-series-gigabit-smart-switches)? It seems that switch in question is working on Layer 2 and incapable of assigning ips to clients - it would just join my router and pc3 into a network so they would be able to communicate. I am not sure if pcs behind the router (pc1,pc2) will be able to communicate with pc3 through router and switch.

There is another solution - place router in front of everything, put switch in place of router (scheme part 3). Still not sure about communication between clients.

 internet          +    internet                 +    internet
    |              |        |                    |        |
    |              |        |                    |        |
    |              |        |                    |        |
    |              |   +----v---+      +-----+   |   +----v---+      +-----+
    |              |   |        |      |     |   |   |        |      |     |
    |              |   | switch +------> pc3 |   |   | router +------> pc3 |
    |              |   |        |      |     |   |   |        |      |     |
    |              |   +---+----+      +-----+   |   +---+----+      +-----+
    |              |       |                     |       |
    |              |       |                     |       |
    |              |       |                     |       |
+---v----+         |   +---v----+                |   +---v----+
|        |         |   |        |                |   |        |
| router |         |   | router |                |   | switch |
|        |         |   |        |                |   |        |
+-+---+--+         |   +-+---+--+                |   +-+---+--+
  |   |            |     |   |                   |     |   |
  |   +----+       |     |   +----+              |     |   +----+
  |        |       |     |        |              |     |        |
+-v---+  +-v---+   |   +-v---+  +-v---+          |   +-v---+  +-v---+
|     |  |     |   |   |     |  |     |          |   |     |  |     |
| pc1 |  | pc2 |   |   | pc1 |  | pc2 |          |   | pc1 |  | pc2 |
|     |  |     |   |   |     |  |     |          |   |     |  |     |
+-----+  +-----+   +   +-----+  +-----+          +   +-----+  +-----+

I am pretty sure there is an elegant solution that could solve this problem with a switch, but I've never worked with switches before: their definition is pretty straightforward, but lack of experience with them stops me.



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Updated April 02, 2017 02:01 AM