Custom enclosures

by Rom   Last Updated March 01, 2017 18:25 PM

I need to produce a small batch (less than 100) of custom enclosures, each made up of 5-6 pieces of plastic. I need surfaces to look smooth and hard (think the quality of a computer keyboard) and one of the pieces needs to be see-through, while another needs to contain several labels.

What are the places you guys are using for this? Also, what is the price range I'm looking at?

Tags : enclosure


Answers 7


Getting custom made plastic anything has a very high startup cost. It's usually not worth it if you need less than a thousand or more.

davr
davr
April 26, 2010 00:39 AM

I've used a place in Colorado called Protogenic for SLA'd parts before. They'll paint and sand models so they look really good, and I believe they can do transparent parts as well. Unfortunately, I suspect that the cost would be quite high-- maybe $150-200 per enclosure?

http://www.protogenic.com/

pingswept
pingswept
April 26, 2010 02:45 AM

I gave the following answer to this earlier question

I would say that to keep costs to a minimum you need to try to fit your product to one of the standard enclosure boxes made by (for example) OKW. The problem with a bespoke mould for your product you are looking at a large NRE charge for the design and some thousands of pounds for the tooling costs.

For a two part moulding the tooling cost was around £6-8k. The design time was a couple of weeks - you do your own sums on the cost of that. You are talking of what sounds like quite a complicated design if it is made up of 6 parts, so expect the costs to rise accordingly.

ʎəʞo uɐɪ
ʎəʞo uɐɪ
April 26, 2010 07:29 AM

Depending on your design constraints, you can accomplish nice things with laser cut acrylic - for example:

http://www.positron.org/projects/juicebox/

Laser etching would then be natural for labels/artwork, or printed artwork inside the clear panels.

Peter Gibson
Peter Gibson
April 26, 2010 12:14 PM

I have made specifically sized enclosures using resins. I made a silicone cast using Smooth-Sil 950 from Smooth On Smooth On. With the silicone compound you can make negatives of the parts you want and then assemble them to form your enclosure. Smooth on has a bunch of different resins probably with similar properties to what you are looking for, and their technical support is great if you are still not sure if the material will act the way you expect. This way you just build one set of negatives allowing you to make as many enclosures as you want!

aaronalai
aaronalai
April 29, 2010 09:55 AM

A bit of an answer from left-field, but the things you can do at Ponoko might be suitable, if you can design something that snaps together or can be assembled... http://www.ponoko.com/

tronixstuff
tronixstuff
April 29, 2010 11:28 AM

robotic ocean sells 23 diameters of plastic enclosures. they are designed to be submerged but you can use them for anything.

thomas
thomas
March 01, 2017 18:16 PM

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